Design and Technology

Intent

DT in the Curriculum:

Design and technology is an inspiring, rigorous and practical subject. Using creativity and imagination, pupils design and make products that solve real and relevant problems within a variety of contexts, considering their own and others’ needs, wants and values. They acquire a broad range of subject knowledge and draw on disciplines such as mathematics, science, engineering, computing and art. Pupils learn how to take risks, becoming resourceful, innovative, enterprising and capable citizens. Through the evaluation of past and present design and technology, they develop a critical understanding of its impact on daily life and the wider world. High-quality design and technology education makes an essential contribution to the creativity, culture, wealth and well-being of the nation.

We are a Rights Respecting school and aim to plan opportunities for children to understand and reflect on the ‘UN convention on the rights of the child (Unicef). Teacher’s planning includes articles which relate to DT.Through the teaching of design and technology in our school we hope to enable children to:

  • develop designing skills, including generating and developing ideas, clarifying a task, creating design proposals, communication ideas, planning and evaluating.
  • acquire and refine the practical skills associated with making, including working with materials and components, tools and processes, for example, planning, measuring and marking out, cutting and shaping, joining and combining, finishing and evaluating.
  • apply scientific skills ,for example, predicting and fair testing.
  • apply mathematical skills, for example, measuring to an appropriate number of decimal places, drawing and interpreting tables, graphs and bar charts.
  • apply computing skills, for example, using databases and spreadsheets.
  • apply art skills, for example, investigating texture and colour or recording visual information.

 

 Implementation

Curriculum Provision:

In Early Years we teach DT as an integral part of the topic work covered during the year. We relate the designing and making aspects of the children’s work to the objectives set out in the Early Learning Goals (ELGs) that underpin the curriculum planning for children aged three to five ‘Expressive Art and Design – Exploring and using media and materials’. The children regularly cook and bake.

Key Stage 1

Through a variety of creative and practical activities, pupils should be taught the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in the process of designing and making. They should work in a range of relevant contexts (for example, the home and school, gardens and playgrounds, the local community, industry and the wider environment).

When designing and making pupils should be taught to:

Design

  • design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria.
  • generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology.

 Make

  • select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks (for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing).
  • select from and use a wide range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their characteristics.

Evaluate

  • explore and evaluate a range of existing products.
  • evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria.

Technical Knowledge

  • build structures, exploring how they can be made stronger, stiffer and more stable.
  • explore and use mechanisms (for example, levers, sliders, wheels and axles) in their products.

Key Stage 2

Through a variety of creative and practical activities, pupils should be taught the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in the process of designing and making. They should work in a range of relevant contexts (for example, the home, school, leisure, culture, enterprise, industry and the wider environment).

When designing and making pupils should be taught to:

Design

  • use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups.
  • generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional and exploded diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design.

 Make

  • select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks (for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing), accurately.
  • select from and use a wide range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities.

 

Evaluate

  • investigate and analyse a range of existing products.
  • evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work.
  • understand how key events and individuals in design and technology helped shape the world.

Technical Knowledge

  • apply their understanding of how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce more complex structures.
  • understand and use electrical systems in their products (for example, gears, pulleys, cams, levers and linkages).
  • understand and use electrical systems in their products (for example, series circuits incorporating switches, bulbs, buzzers and motors).
  • apply their understanding of computing to program, monitor and control their products.

Cooking and Nutrition

As part of their work with food, pupils should be taught how to cook and apply the principles of nutrition and healthy eating. Instilling a love of cooking in pupils will also open a door to one of the great expressions of human creativity. Learning how to cook is a crucial skill that enables pupils to feed themselves and others affordably and well, now and in later life.

Key Stage 1

Pupils should be taught to:

  • use the basic principles of a healthy and varied diet to prepare dishes.
  • understand where food comes from.

Key Stage 2

Pupils should be taught to:

  • understand and apply the principles of a healthy and varied diet.
  • prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes using a range of cooking techniques.
  • understand seasonality, and know where and how a variety of ingredients are grown, reared, caught and processed.

Teaching and Learning:

Our school uses the Twinkl and Cornerstones schemes of work. This incorporates the teaching of design and technology into a half-termly topic based approach. The scheme provides innovative ideas for the teaching of design and technology. Activities are challenging, motivating and extend pupils’ learning.

We teach design and technology to all children, whatever their ability. Design and technology forms part of the school curriculum policy to provide a broad and balanced education to all children. Through our design and technology teaching we provide learning opportunities that enable all pupils to make progress. We do this by setting appropriate learning challenges and responding to each child’s different needs.

Assessment:

Teachers will assess children’s work in design and technology by making informal judgments during lessons as children demonstrate their ability in design and technology in a variety of different ways. Teachers assess the work and give oral or written feedback as necessary to inform future progress. Pupils are encouraged to make judgments about how they can improve their own work. Assessment is done by observing children working, by listening to their responses and by examining and evaluating work produced.

Our Learning Environment:

Work undertaken in design and technology is presented and shared in classrooms. This includes presenting the work they have developed within the lesson. Resources for the current topic should be easily accessible. All classrooms are equipped with an interactive whiteboard to enhance the profile of ICT across the curriculum. We have a school Cookery Club that we encourage all children to join.

Learning Resources:

We have a range of design and technology equipment and resources in school. These are stored in the cupboards in class 3. Cookery is usually carried out in Early Years where there is an oven available. Cookery Club takes place in the school kitchen.

Inclusion and Equal Opportunities:

The full range of activities in design and technology will be made available to all children, irrespective of race, gender or physical disabilities. Where children have a degree of physical, sensory or behavioural difficulties they should be encouraged to participate in such activities with the required help from others or support staff.

Safeguarding and Health and Safety:

Teachers will always teach the safe use of tools and equipment and insist on good practice. Children will be taught to put away tools and equipment when not in use. For further information see the school’s Health and Safety Policy.

Monitoring Design and Technology in school:

The subject leader will coordinate the implementation of the school design and technology planning. If any evidence is to be collected in by the coordinator, staff will be briefed on the expectations beforehand e.g. evidence of differentiation etc. Planning is monitored to ensure it takes account of the range of pupils at our school and is appropriate to our needs. Evidence and quality of wall displays and talking to the children about design and technology will also provide valuable information about design and technology in school. The Design and Technology subject leader is Sarah Gunston.

Impact

Children will learn a wide range of Design Technology skills, from cooking and nutrition, to computer coding and programming. These skills are integral life skills that will provide a basis for the real world. Children will be competent at designing and assessing each other’s work and skills, creating children who are confident self and peer-evaluators.